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Cement, clinker and cementitious materials

Analyze raw materials to finished cement

Modern Portland cement is made by mixing substances containing lime, silica, alumina, and iron oxide and then heating the mixture until it almost fuses. During the heating process dicalcium and tricalcium silicate, tricalcium aluminate, and a solid solution containing iron are formed. X-ray fluorescence (XRF), a standard technique across the cement industry, is used to determine metal-oxide concentrations and oxide stoichiometry. X-ray diffraction (XRD) provides quantitative analysis of free lime in clinker, which is critical to the production process. Kiln parameters are monitored, and adjusted continuously, based on XRD and XRF analytical results. Rigaku technology and know-how provide a number of unique solutions for these measurements.

Cement Industry

Rigaku recommends the following systems:


  • Benchtop tube below sequential WDXRF spectrometer analyzes O through U in solids, liquids and powders

  • New 6th-generation general purpose benchtop XRD system for phase i.d and phase quantification

  • Highly versatile multipurpose X-ray diffractometer with built-in intelligent guidance

  • High-performance, multi-purpose XRD system for applications ranging from R&D to quality control

  • High power, tube below, sequential WDXRF spectrometer with Smart Sample Loading System (SSLS)

  • High power, tube above, sequential WDXRF spectrometer with new ZSX Guidance expert system software

  • High power, tube above, sequential WDXRF spectrometer

  • High-throughput tube below multi-channel simultaneous WDXRF spectrometer analyzes Be through U

  • Performance EDXRF elemental analyzer measures Na to U in solids, liquids, powders and thin-films

  • New 60 kV EDXRF system featuring QuantEZ software and optional standardless analysis

  • EDXRF spectrometer with powerful Windows® software and optional FP.

  • High-performance, Cartesian-geometry EDXRF elemental analyzer measures Na to U in solids, liquids, powders and thin films